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EPGD Law Blog

Author: Oscar Gomez
women signing contract
Civil Litigation
Oscar Gomez

When May a Landlord Withhold a Tenant’s Security Deposit?

A security deposit is a refundable fee a landlord takes from a tenant at the start of a lease term. Landlords may withhold security deposits for several reasons, such as protection against damage to the premises, to cover a loss due to non-payment of rent, or to cover unpaid utilities once the tenant has vacated the premises.

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Foreclosure EPGD
Real Estate Law
Oscar Gomez

What is a “Condition Precedent” to Filing a Foreclosure Action in Florida?

In Florida, if a bank, lender or servicer anticipates filing a foreclosure action, there are certain steps it must take prior to doing so. These provisions are called conditions precedent to foreclosure. State and federal law, as well as the contractual language of the mortgage and promissory note, set forth some of those requirements. Financial institutes are under the obligation to abide by these conditions. Failure to do so opens the door to defenses to the foreclosure claim which can lead to dismissal of the case.

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EPGD Law Litigation
Litigation
Oscar Gomez

What is the New Eleventh Circuit Ruling On Incentive Awards?

An incentive award is a monetary award typically given by the court to the named plaintiff in a class-action case. This is done to compensate the named plaintiff for all of his or her personal time and effort devoted to the case. The public policy behind incentive awards has always been to encourage individuals to take on the role of the named plaintiff in a case, to work closely with the class’s attorneys and other members of the class.

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EPGD Law Litigation
Litigation
Oscar Gomez

What is the Florida Construction Defect Statute (FCDS)?

Due to the frequency of issues arising out of faulty construction, the Florida legislature has created an alternative method to resolve such disputes that would reduce the need for litigation while protecting the rights of property owners. Under the Florida Construction Defect Statute, a property owner or a condominium/homeowner’s association is required to send a written notice of claim to contractors, design professionals and/or developers to resolve alleged defects before resorting to further legal process. 

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EPGD Law LLC
Business Law
Oscar Gomez

How Do I Relocate My LLC to Another State?

The formal transfer of an LLC from one state to another is known as domestication. However, domestication is permitted only if both states allow for it. Domestication would be appropriate if you do no longer wish to conduct business in the original state of formation and would like to avoid dissolution and new company formation in the other jurisdiction. Many business owners choose to domesticate when they completely relocate to another state and wish to move their company with them.

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EPGD Law Special Purpose Acquisition Company
Business Law
Oscar Gomez

What is a Special Purpose Acquisition Company?

A special purpose acquisition company “SPAC” is a publicly traded shell company that has been formed strictly for purposes of raising enough capital to purchase an existing company. Also referred to as a “blank-check company,” these development stage companies have no operations and purely rely on funding through an initial public offering “IPO”.

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EPGD Law Defamation
Litigation
Oscar Gomez

What is Defamation Per Se in Florida?

One of the recurrent issues that Miami business lawyers deal with often involves clients suing for defamation, or vice versa, clients being sued for defamation. Defamation, by definition, is the action of damaging the good reputation of someone. It usually involves a false statement of fact that was published or spoken with fault, or in other words, as a result of negligence or malice.

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EPGD Law Business Litigation
Business Litigation
Oscar Gomez

Can I Collect Attorney’s Fees Under Florida’s Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act?

Unlike other countries, the American rule on attorneys’ fees is that each party must pay the costs of their attorneys. This means, if you’ve hired an expensive attorney to fight for you, you are obligated to pay his costs. Nonetheless, there are two exceptions to the American rule—the contract and statute exceptions. First, if a prior contract that was made between the parties had an attorneys’ fees clause, then the losing party is expected to pay the winning party’s attorneys’ fees. Lastly, a party is permitted to seek the payment of their attorneys’ fees under Florida’s Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act (FDUTPA). A Miami Business Law attorney can advise you if FDUTPA law applies.

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